I’m turning 35. I live with my parents.

965154_10151383892161573_1762578868_oI’m not living the life I envisioned for myself years ago. As I turn 35, I imagine that my younger self would have a Grand Canyon-sized panic attack if I were told that I’d be living with my parents in my mid-30’s.

Hi. My name is Natalie. I am turning 35 today, and I live with my parents.

And believe it or not, that’s not a bad thing. While there was once a major stigma attached to being an adult and living at home, I’ve found that most people’s reactions are, “You live at home? Sweet! Way to pay some stuff off.” I actually know quite a few 30-somethings who live at home these days.

It all started in October of 2012 when my lease was up at my apartment here in Fort Wayne, Ind. Since graduating from IU in 2004, I had lived in three apartments in LaGrange, Georgia, and two apartments in Fort Wayne. I wasn’t sure what my next step in life would be, so my parents suggested I watch their house for them while they spent the winter in Florida. Something was tugging at my heart saying, “Don’t get locked in to a lease.” So I gave in to that feeling, put my belongings in storage, and agreed to stay at my mom and dad’s house for the winter.

970446_10151513086436573_1019058821_nIt turned out to be a good move. It was in March of 2013 that I decided to move to Uganda to teach high school English. I jumped ahead of God a little bit in deciding I would probably be there for many, many years, so I sold everything. All my furniture, pots and pans, etc. etc. All that was left was me and the suitcases I took to Uganda.

I often wonder if God chuckled when I sold everything. He knew I’d only be in Uganda for one year. I didn’t realize it until I spent most of my year oversees being sick, and had to return to the US for better medical care.

So there I was in 2014,. Back from Uganda, seeing every doctor and specialist in town who would try to solve my mysterious illness, my medical bills growing larger and larger, and I had no furniture to put in a place of my own even if I could afford my own apartment. It made sense: move back in with mom and dad.

I decided I would spend another winter in my parents’ house and find my own place in the spring. But the medical bills were outrageous. I still had no furniture. Mom and dad were awesome enough to suggest I stay through just one more winter.

My medical bills are nearly paid off. I’m making major dents in my other debts. Although I’d love to have my own place with my own furniture and belongings again, it’s kind of irresponsible of me to do so when I have this opportunity in front of me.

I’m incredibly lucky that my parents allow me to stay at their home for a very low cost. And they don’t really even spend just the winters in Florida anymore, it’s turned into fall and spring as well. They’re pretty much only home in the summer and for a little bit around the holidays.

For me, this all goes back to selling everything and moving to Uganda. Would I do things differently? Not a chance.

I’m 35. I live at home. I’m paying things off. I’m saving money. I’m building myself back up to where it makes good financial sense for me to get my own place again. I’m not a failure because I’m living at home. My circumstances have brought me here, and I’m making intelligent financial decisions. 12109054_10153064174206573_3760829934399799715_n

I can’t say what 35 has in store for me. Maybe the time will come to start buying furniture and get my own place. Maybe something completely unexpected will happen that I can’t even imagine right now. All I know is that I’m resting peacefully in God’s hands, and His plans for me are better than any others.

7 thoughts on “I’m turning 35. I live with my parents.

  1. racle@yahoo.com

    Very well said…sorry that I was late with birthday wishes…we have no wifi yet in our new condo…leaving for Florida Monday and will deal with it when we come home for the holidays…what about this new man in your life…serious? Hugs Marybeth

    Sent from my iPad

    >

  2. Hi I just turned 35 a couple weeks ago and I live with my parents. My story is not as interesting as yours though. I graduated in a rough economy and my first job out of college I was making minimum wage and when things started to look up, the recession hit in 2008, it really was difficult. I had so many jobs fall through and I was barely making anything.. I am currently working two part time jobs and trying to save some money.

  3. Pingback: A lot of millennials say their parents are their BFFs – 24 365 News

  4. Vitali

    There is nothing wrong with living with your parents if you are responsible, help out around the house and get along with them. In most parts of Asia, South America and Africa kids live with their parents until they get married. Heck, families in many parts of the world have a larger house for the purpose of having the entire family from grandparents to grandkids living under one roof.

    Isn’t it odd that some of the oldest civilizations embrace living with family and find nothing wrong with it. I am not saying stay with your parents and mooch off of them because you are lazy…That is what most people think about when someone says they stay home with their parents…Thats an extreme case and most people live with their parents due to different circumstances.

    I’m 35, have a great career and make close to $200k/year…I can afford to live on my own and i used to for over a decade. Then I realized that i’ve never spent time getting to know my wonderful parents as an adult. When my lease expired, it was a difficult decision at that time but they told me to move back until I figure out what I want to do next. 3 years later, I am still living with my parents and we have great relationship. I get to spend time with my mom in the kitchen and drink whiskey with my dad and getting to know them. This time I spent getting to know them and helping them out is priceless.

    I plan on moving out soon but its because I am getting tired of living in the same town and not because I don’t enjoy living at home and helping out my parents.

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